A few days ago, my Gmail app flashed an email across the screen of my phone.  By mistake, I swiped in the wrong direction, and it opened up an invitation from a medical survey company.  When I had first signed up with this company almost a decade ago, rates were much better (and admittedly, when […]

A few days ago, my Gmail app flashed an email across the screen of my phone.  By mistake, I swiped in the wrong direction, and it opened up an invitation from a medical survey company.  When I had first signed up with this company almost a decade ago, rates were much better (and admittedly, when you are making a resident salary, you don’t have a lot of pride in your per hour worth).  Since then, I’ve watched as they dropped the per minute compensation steadily for similar opportunities, and have started filtering them straight to my spam folder, but for whatever reason, this one slipped through.
When I saw the email, my jaw dropped.  This study was seeking a physician from one of the highest paid subspecialties in medicine (and one that requires a five-year residency), and was offering 30 dollars for 30 minutes.
I struggled with the concept for a second.  Was this company honestly trying to recruit expert physician opinions at a rate of $60/hour?  This, of course, doesn’t include the amount of time trying to get screened into the study to participate – after which the majority of physicians are screened out and receive nothing in return for their attempts.  As much as the whole thing blew my mind, I concluded that more likely than not, they were finding people to do those surveys, and the market was allowing it.
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